Articles in the category living and working

29 Turner Street, London

Humanist secularist Charles Bradlaugh lived here from 1870 to 1877. Visiting This building is not open to the public,

38 Marlborough Place, London

Biologist T.H. Huxley lived in this house in Westminster. Visiting The house is not open to the public.

Freud Museum, London

The Freud Museum celebrates the life and work of Professor Sigmund Freud and his daughter Anna Freud. By the time Freud fled his native Vienna on the eve of World War Two he was known across the world as the father of psychoanalysis. The movement had long since fractured into numerous competing schools, but most accepted […]

St George’s Hill, Weybridge

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Hardy’s Cottage, Higher Bockhampton

Novelist and poet Thomas Hardy was born here and lived here until the age of 34. He wrote Under the Greenwood Tree and Far from the Madding Crowd in the cottage. Young Hardy grew up in an atmosphere of simple worship but as an adult, he encountered the challenges to dogmatic religious belief that were […]

34 Russell Chambers, London

Philosopher Bertrand Russell lived here in flat no.34, 1911-1916. Visiting The house is on Bury Place in Holburn, London. It is a private property but is marked with a Blue Plaque.

Down House, Downe

Home of Charles Darwin. On 17 September 1842 Darwin closed the door of Macaw Cottage, 12 Upper Gower Street, in London, and boarded his horse-drawn carriage for the two-hour journey to his new home, in the village of Down in Kent (now Downe in the Greater London Borough of Bromley). Down House was originally a farmhouse, […]

Palace of Westminster, London

The Palace of Westminster, also known as the Houses of Parliament or Westminster Palace, is the meeting place of the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom—the House of Lords and the House of Commons. A number of prominent humanists and secularists have sat in each houses. One of them – Charles Bradlaugh – was […]

Trinity College, Cambridge

Trinity College was founded by Henry VIII in 1546 as part of the University of Cambridge. Bertrand Russell studied here. Visiting Trinity welcomes visitors to the College for most of the year. Also see… Visting Trinity College

Kelmscott Manor, London

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